Whippet Walking and Exercising

How long should your spend whippet walking and exercising? Less than what you think but you better be prepared.





Whippets don't need to execise more than other dogs, actually they might need less walking than most active breeds.

Whippets are sprinters, not endurance runners and exercising these little hounds might require less time than you expect.

Most whippets will be happy with a daily walk of about an hour, which incidentally is more or less the same quantity of exercise you need to keep fit.

Actually, if the walk is done at a fast pace you burn calories, build muscle and speed your metabolism. 

The daily amount of exercise can be divided in a couple of walking sessions.

Most people and dogs enjoy to have a morning and an evening  walk.

Given the typical partiality of our little hounds for an “all out” running style, probably at the beginning of the dog walk, your dog will run at breakneck speed in circles around you or play catch with other dogs.

Then, after letting some steam out, he will come back and trot along for the rest of the stroll.



Whippet Walking for Training

If you have a big yard you might be tempted to think that just letting your dog out will provide enough exercise.

The canine mind doesn’t work this way, you will have to take the role of the leader in these daily expeditions.

Use this time as an opportunity to build a bond with your pet.

Besides, looking at a hound running is a great aesthetic pleasure, our daily allowance of beauty and strength.

Walking, playing and training your dog during a stroll will build a strong relationship and will provide for both of you a pleasurable way to release stress and keep in shape.

Take advantage of this quality time to practice dog walking training or the recall by calling your dog often and rewarding good behavior with a treat.

The essential dog walking accessories are the leash and collar. 

A useful dog walking tip is to use a martingale collar for hounds

These collars are safe, beautiful and considerably speed up the dog working training. They tighten gently when the dog pulls thus working as an effective and safe dog walking training tool.

A good daily walk can also prevent many behavioral problems like separation anxiety and destructiveness.

A tired and satisfied dog is always calmer, better behaved and more obedient.

A word of caution must be spent for the dangers of cars. Dogs don’t have any traffic sense.

Inevitably your whippet will run after a squirrel or a cat given the opportunity and after a good chase he will happily come back to you. If give the opportunity they will run full speed for few minutes and contently sleep for the rest of the day.

But, be warned, have your whippet well trained before you unleash him!



Whippet Walking Hazards


We were hardly aware of the dangers of a whippet at large until that memorable day at the park when we went hiking with dogs.

Zippo, our first whippet, had always been a smart but somewhat mischievous puppy but certainly we didn’t expect the commotion he provoked at the natural reserve on that quiet and sunny afternoon.

I innocently unleashed him for the customary wild run around us but there were far too many distractions around, the situation quickly got out of hand and degenerated in a general upheaval.

At a miraculous speed, our whippet crossed a stream that separated us from a field full of quietly resting cows and he wasn’t satisfied until all the cows were up and about.

By the time they were all up and trying to find out what was all the commotion about, Zippo was back, viciously attacking a jumper left unattended by an unsuspecting group of boy scouts.

To the boys’ protests he dropped it and diverted his attention to a more succulent picnic nearby. As he was vigorously shooed away by the picnickers, Zippo decided for a quick dip in a fragrant cow dung until he finally came triumphantly back to me covered in fetid muck.

While I watched flabbergasted and impotent this disaster unfold, our other whippet, blessed with a less adventurous temperament, was sticking close to us.

He seemed to look puzzled that it was actually possible for Zippo to behave so badly and not be incinerated by a lightning from the guardian god of the rural quiet.



So, when we decided to go dog hiking with our new whippet pup, I was rather cautious before releasing her and I had her scrupulously trained in the basic good dog skills: the recall and walking on leash.

In fact, she behaved marvelously, she judiciously stuck close to us and I only had to reprimand her when she decided to engage some cows in a dangerously vivacious game.

We practiced the puppy training game of calling her to each other frequently to reinforce the lesson.

It was also a very good occasion to get her used to the car.

She still suffered car sickness but with practice she got used to the car trips and she associated them to the pleasure of trekking.

Whippet walking is one of life’s great pleasures and a fun way to discover new places and get fit with your pet.

Before starting remember to:

- teach your dog basic manners, for his and others’ safety

- build up his endurance slowly with short walks.

- bring water and a collapsible bowl for your dog

- if necessary use some of the water to cool down your pet, dogs don’t sweat and can easily get overheated.







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